Some Thoughts on our Mock-Printz Books

Not sold on the books just yet? Here’s what we had to say about four on our reading list!

Scythe Neal Shusterman

“This book deals with morality and the problems that arise when it is taken away.”—Matt  

“Despite the exciting plot, the mind blowing setting and the world building, the author still gave us time to get to know the characters….two people that I could really root for.”—Krista

“It does the futuristic world building that’s almost entirely believable (except for the whole space thing) while keeping me entertained with an actual plot and fascinating characters.”– Elizabeth

 

Vassa in the Night Sarah Porter

“This book is an amalgamation of Russian folklore in modern day Brooklyn. The language is beautiful and the characters are intriguing.  The magical revision of this book captured me from the first page.”—Emma

“Intriguing…everything is a character in a way that is amazing.” –Ashleigh

 

The Boy at the Top of the Mountain John Boyne

“This story feels very real and shows you how a person can be sucked into ideas.” –William

“This book puts you in a boy’s shoes as he becomes a tiny Hitler monster.”—Byron

“I really loved the plot and the setting. It shows Pierrot’s fall into Nazi beliefs in such a way that it’s scary to think he’s only a child for most of the book.” –Ashleigh

“The downward spiral of how the main character becomes Hitler’s little buddy is terrifying …” –Elizabeth

 

Spontaneous Aaron Starmer

“It does the teenager thing in a way that’s entirely accurate to the inner workings of a teenager’s head along with the most fascinating, semi-realistic plot I’ve read in a while.” –Elizabeth

“The teen voice in this book is its strongest aspect. As teenagers start exploding in a small town, the emotions that run through the characters are the same that would run through mine.”–Emma

 

If you need us, we’ll be reading…

 

–The Eva Perry Mock-Printz Club

Mock Printz Winner 2013

After delaying the meeting twice due to weather, the Eva Perry Mock Printz Book Club met for their final decision on what books published in 2012 would be the Mock Printz winners. After much lively discussion, we had our final vote.

railseaThe winner is Railsea by China Mieville

Things cited about this books were its fantastic, unique setting, and the gorgeous writing of Mieville.  People also loved how, despite the fact that the setting is archaic and foreign, Mieville puts you right in the middle, so that you are experiencing things as the characters might.  The people in this world don’t know what we know about trains and helicopters, etc.  Mieville also creates new words in the English language, which is what will happen in the future, when this books is set.

We selected two Honor books:  Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein and The Children and the Wolves by Adam Rapp.

verityFor Code Name Verity, the group loved the characters in this book, two very different girls with a strong bond of friendship.  We also liked how the narrator was unreliable, and we didn’t know what the truth was until the very end of the book, and maybe we never will know the full truth about Verity.  The theme was carried through the book in all sorts of ways you didn’t realize.

Children of the wolvesChildren and the Wolves was probably the most controversial book in the club.  The content is horrific.  There isn’t a hero, and whether or not Wiggins is even a sympathetic narrator was up for debate.  The writing was condensed.  At times, there was even discussion of “is there a theme?” and if that matters for a book.  It was hotly debated.  In the end, what we could all agree on, was that this book was unique and we know that Printz is famous for giving edgy books a shot.

What a year.  What were your picks, and are you ready to hear the official winners tomorrow?

Visit with Jasper Fforde, October 2012

Jasper Fforde meets Printz Club (from left to right): Heather, Ellen, Lindsey (me), Danny, and Karen.

Several of our Printz Club members received the opportunity to meet privately with Jasper Fforde before a book signing at Quail Ridge Books and Music on October 22, 2012.  Right before his public speaking event, he met with club members to answer questions about writing, his books, and some of his inspirations.  For this year, Fforde is the author of The Last Dragonslayer, one of the books in consideration for the Mock Printz Award.  Continue reading

Replication: The Jason Experiment by Jill Williamson

Martyr—otherwise known as Jason 3:3—is one of hundreds of clones kept in a remote facility called Jason Farms. Told that he has been created to save humanity, Martyr has just one wish before he is scheduled to ‘expire’ in less than a month. To see the sky. Abby Goyer may have just moved to Alaska, but she has a feeling something strange is going on at the farm where her father works. But even this smart, confident girl could never have imagined what lies beneath a simple barn. Or what would happen when a mysterious boy shows up at her door, asking about the stars. As the reality of the Jason Experiment comes to light, Martyr is caught between two futures—the one for which he was produced and the one Abby believes God created him to have. Time is running out, and Martyr must decide if a life with Abby is worth leaving everything he’s ever known.

Zonderkidz

Partials, by Dan Wells

Humanity is all but extinguished after a war with partials—engineered organic beings identical to humans—has decimated the world’s population. Reduced to only tens of thousands by a weaponized virus to which only a fraction of humanity is immune, the survivors in North America have huddled together on Long Island. The threat of the partials is still imminent, but, worse, no baby has been born immune to the disease in over a decade. Humanity’s time is running out.

Balzer + Bray

Find it at WCPL here.

Never Eighteen by Megan Bostic

Austin Parker is never going to see his eighteenth birthday. At the rate he’s going, he probably won’t even see the end of the year. But in the short time he has left there’s one thing he can do: He can try to help the people he loves live—even though he never will.

It’s probably hopeless. But he has to try.

HMH Children’s Books

I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga

What if the world’s worst serial killer…was your dad? Jasper (Jazz) Dent is a likable teenager. A charmer, one might say. But he’s also the son of the world’s most infamous serial killer, and for Dear Old Dad, Take Your Son to Work Day was year-round. Jazz has witnessed crime scenes the way cops wish they could–from the criminal’s point of view. And now bodies are piling up in Lobo’s Nod. In an effort to clear his name, Jazz joins the police in a hunt for a new serial killer. But Jazz has a secret–could he be more like his father than anyone knows?

Little, Brown

Find it at WCPL here.