Catch & Release, by Blythe Woolston

Summary: Eighteen-year-old Polly and impulsive, seventeen-year-old Odd survive a deadly outbreak of flesh-eating bacteria, but resulting wounds have destroyed their plans for the future and with little but their unlikely friendship and a shared affection for trout fishing, they set out on a road trip through the West.

Carolrhoda

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1 Comment

  1. This book lends an engaging story line and an interesting take on the pilgrimage archetype. For me, the most forthcoming aspect of this book is how the characters exhibit an accurate amount of character development as the book progresses. While the characters (especially the main protagonist) are described as to have experienced huge swings in world view as to be expected alongside the life altering experience of a near death encounter, as the book progresses the author relies on the simple idea that “less is more:” as is certainty the case for character development in teen literature. While the “monster of the week” style depicts the two teens journey; the two characters experiencing one primary conflict at a time in the background of their greater problems; I feel as though this sort of style lends itself to helping the characters decompress and begin to face their respective problems.

    Although I enjoyed the description and location of this book’s setting and, as mentioned, I thought that the character development was accurate–Catch and Release will not be getting my vote this year for the Mock Printz award. The most pressing problem that keeps me from voting for this book is not so much the essence or idea of what the characters reactions/relationship to/with each other is; rather, the way that the actual word choice for the characters’ voices is presented seams a off to me with my opinion being that the voices are almost a little too casual.

    An exciting book; one that will have no trouble getting more readers as it has some seriously positive aspects in the character development, the setting and the well paced plot.

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